August 28, 2011


7/16”, 14ga Navel Cluster in ASTM F-136 titanium, anodized light blue; genuine diamond, genuine blue zircon, genuine yellow topaz gemstones

7/16”, 14ga Navel Cluster in ASTM F-136 titanium, anodized light blue; genuine diamond, genuine blue zircon, genuine yellow topaz gemstones

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September 12, 2011


4ga Gemmed Eyelets in ASTM F-138 stainless steel; genuine diamond gemstones

4ga Gemmed Eyelets in ASTM F-138 stainless steel; genuine diamond gemstones

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September 29, 2011


5/8” Orbit Eyelets in solid 18k yellow gold; genuine diamonds.

5/8” Orbit Eyelets in solid 18k yellow gold; genuine diamonds.

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November 13, 2011


8ga Gemmed Eyelets in solid 18k yellow gold; genuine Diamond gemstones 

8ga Gemmed Eyelets in solid 18k yellow gold; genuine Diamond gemstones 

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April 7, 2012


Threaded Flowers in solid 18k yellow gold; genuine black diamonds

Threaded Flowers in solid 18k yellow gold; genuine black diamonds

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April 21, 2012


Genuine gemstones? We do that too, just ask!Shown: 14ga Gold Flower Navel Curve in solid 18k white gold with genuine diamonds. 
Genuine Peridot, genuine Ruby, genuine Amethyst, genuine Emerald, genuine Aquamarine, genuine Garnet, genuine Sapphire, genuine Citrine gemstones 

Genuine gemstones? We do that too, just ask!

Shown: 14ga Gold Flower Navel Curve in solid 18k white gold with genuine diamonds. 

Genuine Peridot, genuine Ruby, genuine Amethyst, genuine Emerald, genuine Aquamarine, genuine Garnet, genuine Sapphire, genuine Citrine gemstones 

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July 13, 2012


Diamonds Part 1

Here at Anatometal, we often get inquiries about diamonds. Customers want to know about pricing, cut, clarity, where we buy from, etc. All of these points are important so we decided to explain this stone to you all. This article will be broken up into two pieces, turns out there is a lot to know about this gemstone!

In mineralogy, diamond is an allotrope of carbon where the carbon atoms are arranged in a variation of the face-centered cubic crystal structure called a diamond lattice. Diamond is renowned as a material with unparallelled physical qualities, most of which originate from the strong covalent bonding between its atoms. Most notable are its extreme hardness and thermal conductivity, as well its wide bandgap and high optical dispersion. Specifically, diamond has the highest hardness and thermal conductivity of anydiamond1 bulk material.

Most natural diamonds are formed at high-pressure, high-temperature conditions that exist at depths of 87 to 120 miles in the Earth’s mantle. Carbon-containing minerals provide the carbon source, and the growth occurs over periods from 1 billion to 3.3 billion years. Diamonds are then brought close to the Earth’s surface through deep volcanic eruptions by a magma, which cools into igneous rocks known as kimberlites and lamproites.

The name Diamond is derived from the ancient Greek word adámas which means proper, unalterable, unbreakable and untamed. They are thought to have been first recognized and mined in India, where significant alluvial deposits of the stone could be found many centuries ago along the rivers Penner, Krishna and Godavari. Diamonds have been treasured as gemstones since their use with religious icons in ancient India but they have also been used as engraving tools dating back to early human history. Today, the most familiar use of diamonds is as gemstones for adornment.

The diamodiamonds2nd industry can be separated into two distinct categories: one dealing with gem-grade diamonds and another for industrial-grade diamonds. Both markets value diamonds differently. When looking at gem grade diamonds, there are a handful of factors that determine the stones value. One of these is cut, this is an objective measure of a diamond’s light performance, or, what we generally think of as sparkle. When a diamond is cut with the proper proportions, light is returned out of the top of the diamond. If it is cut too shallow, light leaks out of the bottom; too deep and it escapes out of the side. The grades of diamonds cuts are:

Ideal cut: Represents roughly the top 3% of diamond quality based on cut. Reflects nearly all light that enters the diamond. An exquisite and rare cut.
Very good cut: Represents roughly the top 15% of diamond quality based on cut. Reflects nearly as much light as the ideal cut, but for a lower price.
Good cut: Represents roughly the top 25% of diamond quality based on cut. Reflects most light that enters. Much less expensive than a very good cut
Fair cut: Represents roughly the top 35% of diamond quality based on cut. Still a quality diamond, but a fair cut will not be as brilliant as a good cut.
Poor cut: Diamonds that are generally so deep and narrow or shallow and wide that they lose most of the light out the sides and bottom.

diamond cut 
Color is also important when grading a diamond and actually refers to a diamond’s lack of color; grading the whiteness of a stone. A color grade of D is the highest possible, while Z is the lowest.Color manifests itself in a diamond as a pale yellow which is why a diamond’s color grade is based on its lack thereof. The less color a diamond has, the higher its color grade. After cut, color is generally considered the second most important characteristic when selecting a diamond. The diamond color chart is as follows:

 
Z - N: Noticeable color
M - K: Noticeable Color
J - I: Near Colorless, slightly detectable warmth or tone
H - G: Color difficult to detect unless compared side by side with diamonds of a higher grade
F - E: Colorless
D: Absolutely colorless, very rare

Next comes clarity which is a measure of the number and size of the tiny imperfections that occur in almost all diamonds. Many of these imperfections are microscopic, and do not affect a diamond’s beauty in any discernible way. Clarity simply refers to the tiny, natural imperfections that occur in all but the finest diamonds. Gemologists refer to these imperfections by a variety of technical names, including blemishes and inclusions.

Flawless and Internally Flawless: No internal or external imperfections. Internally Flawless: No internal imperfections. Very rare.
Very Very Slightly Included: Very difficult to see imperfections under 10x magnification. An excellent quality diamond.
Very Slightly Included: Imperfections are not typically visible to the unaided eye.
Slightly Included: Imperfections are visible under 10x magnification, and may be visible with the unaided eye.
Included: Heavily included imperfections.     


Finally, there is carat weight. As the name suggests, carat weight specifically refers to a diamond’s weight. However, much as a person’s weight does not necessarily correlate with height, carat weight, by itself, may not accurately reflect a diamond’s size.

So the next time you are in the market for a diamond or two, remember to keep the 4 C’s in mind; they will all affect the value of a stone greatly. In the second part of this look at diamonds, we will address issues such as where we buy diamonds, how to make sure stones you purchase are not blood diamonds, industrial use, mining, and all the rest . Tune in next month!
roundprincessfancy

(Source: archive.constantcontact.com)

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July 15, 2012


Part Two:

Last month we started our two part look at diamonds; we talked about the chemical properties of the gemstone, how they are formed, where the word “diamond” comes from, a brief history of, and  we covered the four Cs. This month we will look into uses other than adorn
ment, mining, and how to make sure your diamonds are conflict free.

Approximately 130,000,000 carats of diamonds are mined annually, with a total value of nearly $9 billion, and about 220,000 lbs are synthesized annually. Roughly 4rough diamond9% of diamonds originate from Central and Southern Africa, although significant sources of the mineral have been discovered in Canada, India, Russia, Brazil, and Australia. They are mined from kimberlite and lamproite volcanic pipes, which can bring diamond crystals that originate from deep within the Earth where high pressures and temperatures enable them to form, to the surface. Only a very small fraction of the diamond ore consists of actual diamonds. The ore is crushed, during which special care is required not to destroy larger diamonds, and then sorted by density.

Diamond extraction from primary deposits started in the 1870s after the discovery of the Diamond Fields in South Africa. Production has increased over time and now an accumulated total of 4,500,000,000 carats have been mined since that date. Twenty percent of that amount has been mined in the last five years, and during the last 10 years, nine new mines have started production; four more are waiting to be opened soon. Most of these mines are located in Zimbabwe, Angola, and Russia. In the U.S., diamonds have been found in Arkansas, Colorado, and Montana. There are also commercial deposits being actively mined in the Northwest Territories of Canada and Brazil.

In some of the more politically unstable central African and West African countries, revolutionary groups have taken control of diamond mines, using proceeds from diamond sales to finance their operations. Diamonds sold through this process are known as conflict diamonds or blood diamonds. Major diamond trading corporations continue to fund and fuel these conflicts by doing business with armed groups. In response to public concerns that their diamond purchases were contributing to war and human rights abuses in central Africa and West Africa, the United Nations, the diamond industry and diamond-trading nations introduced the Kimberley Process in 2002, which is aimed at ensuring that conflict diamonds do not become intermixed with the diamonds not controlled by such rebel groups. This Act provides documentation and certification of diamond exports from producing countries to ensure that the proceeds of sale are not being used to fund criminal or revolutionary activities. Although the Kimberley Process has been moderately successful in limiting the number of conflict diamonds entering the market, conflict diamonds smuggled to market continue to persist to some degree: about 2-3% of diamonds traded today are possible conflict diamonds.

In a further attempt to ensure blood diamonds don’t make it to the market, President Bill Clinton issued Executive Order 13194 which prohibited the importation of rough diamonds from Sierra Leone into the United States in accordance with the UN resolutions and President George W. Bush issued Executive Order 13213 which banned rough diamond importation from Liberia into the United States: Liberia had been recognized by the United Nations as acting as a pipeline for conflict diamonds from Sierra Leone.

As mentioned, there are diamond mines in Canada and the Canadian Government has set up a body known as Canadian Diamond Code of Conduct to help authenticate Canadian diamonds. This is a stringent tracking system of diamonds and helps protect the “conflict free” label of Canadian diamonds. Each diamond is also laser inscribed and recorded in a database. At Anatometal, we deal exclusively with Canadian diamonds so rest assured, any diamond jewelry you buy from us is blood free.

Diamonds are used for more then just jewelry and decoration.
Industrial diamonds are valued mostly for their hardness and thermal conductivity, making many of the gemological characteristics of diamonds, such as the 4 Cs irrelevant for most applications. This helps explain why 80% of mined diamonds unsuitable for use as gemstones are destined for industrial use. The boundary between gem-quality diamonds and industrial diamonds is poorly defined and partly depends on market conditions, for example, if demand for polished diamonds is high, some stones otherwise bound for industrial use will be polished into low-quality or small gemstones.

Industrial use of diamonds has historically been associated with their hardness; this property makes diamond the ideal material for cutting and grinding tools. As the hardest known naturally occurring material, diamond can be used to polish, cut, or wear away any material, including other diamonds! Common industrial adaptations of this ability include diamond-tipped drill bits and saws, and the use of diamond powder as an abrasive. Less expensive industrial-grade diamonds known as bort, with more flaws and poorer color than gems, are used for the aforementioned purposes.

Finally, how can you identify a diamond? Early tests included a scratch test which relied on the superior hardness of a diamond. This test is however destructive since a diamond can scratch diamond, and is therefore rarely used nowadays. Instead, diamond identification relies on its superior thermal conductivity. Electronic thermal probes are widely used in the gemological centers to separate diamonds from their imitations. These probes consist of a pair of battery-powered thermistors mounted in a fine copper tip. One thermistor functions as a heating device while the other measures the temperature of the copper tip: if the stone being tested is a diamond, it will conduct the tip’s thermal energy rapidly enough to produce a measurable temperature drop. This test takes about 2-3 seconds.

So in short, diamonds have a long and sorted history but thanks to the efforts of many nations, the sale of blood diamonds has been significantly cut down. To be 100% sure you are buying conflict free, buy Canadian like we do! Diamonds are used for adornment and as industrial tools, they come in many different colors, and can be cut in many different shapes. Love them or hate them, we hope we answered some of your questions and cleared up points you were uncertain on.

(Source: archive.constantcontact.com)

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July 10, 2013


00ga Gemmed Eyelets in solid 18k yellow gold with genuine Diamonds

00ga Gemmed Eyelets in solid 18k yellow gold with genuine Diamonds

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